Leaky gut, autoimmunity, and mental health. Is there a link? P.2 of 3


Leaky gut and our gut microbes



Our friendly gut microbes, the third innermost layer of our gut, include hundreds of types of microbes. Some of the main types of bacteria are Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes (e.g. Lactobacillus). We think problems with our gut microbes might actually begin the whole process of leaking guts.


According to Sturgeon and Fasano, 2016:


“It is now clear there is a symbiotic relationship between the microbiome and the host. As early as 2001, it was described that commensal bacteria have an effect on intestinal permeability.”


  • Here’s how we think this happens, based on the current research:

  • The third innermost layer of the gut lining, the microbiota, get out of balance.

  • Inflammatory molecules (including zonulin) are released, and fewer anti-inflammatory ones like SCFAs are available.

  • This inflammation disturbs the tight junctions in first layer of enterocytes, hence creating tiny leaks which allows passage of harmful compounds into our bodies.


It starts when the gut microbiota are in dysbiosis (an “imbalance” of “good” and “bad” microbes). This promotes an inflammatory response because some of the “bad” microbes are pushing out the “good” ones that produce the anti-inflammatory short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). SCFAs are anti-inflammatory and are also used as fuel by the enterocytes. Some of these SCFAs promote the production of the mucus layer (the second layer), and even help to improve the tight junctions in the enterocytes in the first layer. They produce the SCFAs when they eat fibre and resistant starch.

One study looked at children who were at risk of developing type 1 diabetes (which is an autoimmune condition). Researchers found that some who had an increase in one of the “bad” microbes went on to develop autoimmunity months later which led to type 1 diabetes.

Another possibility that researchers are looking at is that some of these “bad” bacteria produce a toxin that mimics zonulin. Zonulin is a protein naturally released by our enterocytes when they’re exposed to certain things we eat, like “bad” bacteria on our food and gliadin (part of the gluten protein found in wheat and other grains). Blood levels of zonulin tend to be higher in people with autoimmune conditions like celiac disease and type 1 diabetes.


All of this increased inflammation then irritates the gut, which can result in loosening of those tight junctions. Based on the research so far, this is the way we think we develop leaky guts.


But, how does this relate to autoimmunity?

Leaky gut, allergies, and autoimmunity


Allergies and autoimmunity are directly linked to our immune system. They result when our immune system works a bit too hard - when our immune cells become a little too active.Allergies occur when our immune system is activated to fight things that are not harmful, like certain foods, pollen, or pet dander. The body thinks they’re dangerous invaders that must be fought, and sends out immune cells that cause inflammation to try and eliminate the allergen.


Autoimmunity, on the other hand, is when our immune system is activated to fight our own cells and tissues. The immune system becomes “intolerant to self.” For example, type 1 diabetes (an autoimmune disease) occurs when our immune system fights the insulin-producing cells in our pancreas. After continued inflammation, enough of these cells die and we eventually need to start monitoring our own blood sugar levels and provide our bodies with external insulin. This occurs more often in people who have type 1 diabetes in their families.


Many things can contribute to autoimmunity, and leaky gut may be a bigger factor than we once thought. This is because of the impact of allowing undigested food, bacteria, etc. enter our bodies and how our immune system tries to fight them. A large part of our immune system is located just on the other side of that one-cell thick layer of enterocytes.


When our bodies detect things in our internal circulation that don’t belong (like undigested food or bacteria) our immune system kicks in. This immune response to things that “leaked” into our bodies can cause the release of even more inflammatory compounds this time inside our bodies and bloodstreams (i.e. on the other side of the first layer of enterocytes). The allergic and inflammatory responses that happen around our guts may affect the gut directly. But, once these are absorbed into the bloodstream, they can affect other parts of the body too. This is the connection we see between leaky gut, allergies, and autoimmunity. It’s not just the leaky gut, it’s the interactions between what leaks into our bodies and our immune system’s response to them.


Having a healthy gut microbiota plays an important role in how our immune systems mature from when we were infants. Dysbiosis in our gut at an early age can promote changes in our immune response, and increase the risk of allergic and autoimmune diseases. It seems that gut dysbiosis and “leaky gut” might be part of the chain of reactions that lead our immune cells to start attacking things they really don’t need to.


 

Next week on Part 3:

  • Leaky gut and mental health

  • What you can do about leaky gut

  • References

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